How to Make Fairy Furniture from Twigs

leafy benchLook over my shoulder in this video to quickly learn how to make fairy furniture from twigs. Below the video you will find a detailed supply list that I hope you find handy as you prepare to make your own little work of art.

My 7 minute video tutorial on

How to Make Fairy Furniture from Twigs…

Miniature Twig Furniture Supply List

First the essentials…

Dried Naturals for Fairy Furniture

These vary in color from a blue tone like you see here to much greener.

Eucalyptus leaves

For the fairy garden bench I created in the video tutorial, I clipped off most of the leaves and saved them for other projects.  I left a few leaves to stylize with scissors and paint.

You most certainly can use twigs you find outside but then you won’t be able to also use the leaves. The dried eucalyptus twigs are bug-free, yet still flexible & the smell is amazing. If you want to buy as few supplies as necessary, you could make the seat out of twigs as well and skip buying the bark.

 

24 gauge wire

If you have floral wire lying around at home you could use that just as well. I like the various colors the jewelry wire comes in, such as silver, gold, or the colors of the rainbow.
I often coordinate the wire color with the decorative findings I use on my piece.

Moss CollectionDried moss

I love to use all kinds of different varieties of dried moss, but I especially love the clumpy kind for hiding glue.  I haven’t noticed much of a difference between the various brands that offer dried moss, I’ve been using this stuff lately from Amazon, and it’s been great.  Just stay clear of the dried moss at the dollar store and you’ll do fine.

And now for some optional supplies…

Glitter or dry dirt (optional)

I like the extra fine glitter because it looks like fairy dust, of course. I will often use the glitter right after gluing some decorative finding onto my piece. I sprinkle the glitter on while the glue is still hot. Then I push down on the glue to help hide it. The glitter adds beauty and gives my finger a padding so the glue doesn’t burn me. You can also use very dry dirt for the same effect.

Large chunk of bark (optional)

Super Moss Decorative MossYou can use any other flat natural object just as well. Other seat ideas would include a large flat shell, a flat rock, or you could always just wrap a bunch of twigs together with wire. The bark I use comes in big bags and is typically used as garden mulch. I like garden mulch bark much better than what I find in the woods because it is guaranteed to be bug-free.

Super Moss makes decorative bark
but you don’t get nearly as much bang for your buck.  This might be the appropriate choice, though, if you don’t want to make the trek to the garden store.

Pearl Finish Acrylic Paint (optional)

Of course you may prefer to skip this step since it covers some of that lovely Eucalyptus smell. I use this pearl finish craft paint
by Cermacoat, but any acrylic paint would work just fine.

Embellishments (optional)

You’re going to love shopping for this stuff. I sometimes find my metal parts from thrift stores or garage sales, but Amazon has a great selection of odds and ends
You can also try the jewelry section at Hobby Lobby (they often will have stuff at 50% off).

You can create a lovely patina on your metal parts using salt, peroxide, & vinegar. This is a great way to achieve a naturally old and worn for your decorative metal findings. Be careful not to over rust them though!

Acorns and acorn tops (optional)

I use a wooden acorn with a real acorn top in the video. I don’t like to use real acorns because they usually have bugs (are you beginning to see a theme here?). People ask about drying real acorns, and that just seems like a whole lot of fussing about to me. The wooden ones look amazingly real, and wood is a natural material anyway. Acorn tops from the wild are usually just fine to use on your project.  I buy these adorable little acorns from a little Etsy shop called StreetCarJunction.  They are super reasonable, $8.95 buys you 70 wooden acorns.

Oh, I hope you love playing with this stuff as much as I do.  Find out when more tutorials are available by subscribing to my newsletter.

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